SIA Fleet: Boeing 777-200

The SIA 777-200 fleet currently operates in two configurations – Version 2 and Version 3. Both configurations are identical in total seats (including by cabin class), but as they have a slightly different seating, galley and toilet layout, so we assess them separately.

Boeing 777-200
38 J (2009 RJ)
228 Y
(2006 Y)
266 Total
777-200 aircraft in service at 6th December 2018: 7
9V-SQL 9V-SRM 9V-SRQ
9V-SQM 9V-SRO
9V-SQN 9V-SRP

How can I tell which Version I am flying on?

If you’re flying Business Class and the seat map shows row 18, it’s Version 2. If there is no row 18, it’s Version 3.

If you’re flying Economy Class, Version 2 and Version 3 have identical layouts with seats up to row 57 in both cases.

If the seat map does not resemble any of the above options, it’s possible you’re flying on a 777-200ER, click here for details.

What happened to Version 1?

The older 777-200 Version 1 aircraft with the ‘blue recliner’ Ultimo business class seats had all been retired by March 2018. See our article about the final departure from the fleet.

777-200 Version 2: Business Class

This version of the SIA 777-200 is fitted with their regional business class product – a 2-2-2 configuration with 172-degree recline (almost flat, but not quite!). That gives rise to three main concerns – aisle access, privacy, and, perhaps most importantly, sleeping.

Business class seats on the 777-200 Version 2 are fitted with the regional business product in a 2-2-2 configuration.
(Photo: Edwin Leong)
Regional Business Class on the 777-200. Daytime snooze yes, but don’t count on a good night’s sleep.
(Photo: Edwin Leong)

For a daytime flight it’s actually quite acceptable, especially when travelling as a couple. Overnight it’s one to avoid due to the angled bed (good enough for a daytime snooze in our opinion, but not conducive to a good night’s sleep).

Travelling solo, these seats aren’t great for privacy. There is a reasonably-sized privacy divider between each seat pair, but it doesn’t afford you the seclusion of the newest business class seats in the fleet.

Best Seats

The business class section on the Version 2 aircraft is split across two cabin sections, the forward section of three rows (four centre pairs), and a second cabin after the second set of main aircraft cabin doors, which has a further three rows.

There are three toilets in business class, one at the front and two at the second set of main aircraft doors, between the two cabins. You can avoid some of the foot traffic by choosing a seat in the rear cabin.

B772v2_J.jpg
777-200 (Version 2) Business Class Seat Map

Seats 11 D/F as well as 12 A/C and 12 H/K benefit from some additional legroom, as does all of row 17, though beware the infant bassinets are also at these rows so there is a possibility of disturbance, and the IFE screens are mounted on the bulkhead wall in front of you as there is no seat in front.

We usually hedge our bets around halfway down either of the business cabins (row 14 or row 18) for this reason, especially on an overnight sector.

Worst Seats

Row 16: Proximity to the galley and toilets means more foot traffic and potentially more noise in this row. Although there is a full galley between row 16 and the first row in the second business class section (row 17), be aware that row 17 has two additional bassinet positions, and that some noise is therefore possible. Avoid.

Row 19: Proximity to first row of the economy class section (row 31) may mean some noise as row 31 has three bassinet positions. Avoid.

Other Tips

If travelling solo, one of the middle seats (D or F) is preferable. In the best case, no one will select the seat next to you, giving you ample extra space. In the worst case, both you and the stranger next to you have unrestricted aisle access (i.e. you won’t be stuck in the window seat having to climb over their legs in the middle of the night, or vice-versa).

As a couple it’s up to you whether you prefer the middle D/F pair for the same unrestricted aisle access for each passenger, or a window pair A/C or H/K. We tend to go for the window pair, as it provides more privacy especially for the window passenger.

777-200 Version 2: Economy Class

B772v2_Y.jpg
777-200 (Version 2) Economy Class Seat Map

The economy cabin on the Version 2 aircraft is spread across two similarly-sized main sections in a 3-3-3 layout.

Best Seats

The first row in the cabin (row 31) is at the bulkhead and so offers extra legroom, but this is also the main bassinet position in the economy class section so some noise is possible if there are infants on board.

Seats 44 A/B and 44 J/K are also exit row seats with extra legroom, and have the benefit of being ‘couple pairs’ which are rare on this aircraft in economy. However, the window seats (A&K) at this row are missing a window, and a bassinet position is nearby in the centre seats of the immediate row behind.

Those centre seats 45 D/E/G also have extra legroom, but as mentioned two bassinet stations are a potential drawback.

Seats 45C and 45H have no seat in front of them and therefore significant extra legroom.

Seats  56A/C and 56H/K may well be the best ‘couple pairs’ on this aircraft, despite being very near the back, as the ‘couple’ seat pairs behind those (57 A/C and 57 H/K) are right next to the rear galley / toilet and so slightly less desirable.

Worst Seats

Row 36 A/K seats: For the window seats at row 36, the window is missing. If you’re a fan of the view outside, or just plain claustrophobic, avoid.

Rows 42, 43 & 57: These rows are located right in front of either the main bank of six toilets (rows 42 & 43), or the rear economy galley (row 57), meaning lots of foot traffic, queuing and noise around these seats. Avoid.

777-200 Version 3: Business Class

Version 3 of the SIA 777-200, like Version 2, is fitted with their regional business class seats – so our comments above on that product also apply to these aircraft.

B772v3_J.jpg
777-200 (Version 3) Business Class Seat Map

The same business class seat total is achieved on the 777-200 Version 3 business class, 38 seats. The forward section contains one extra row, however, and the second section just has two rows instead of three.

Best Seats

There are three toilets in business class, one at the front and two at the second set of main aircraft doors, between the two cabins. You can avoid some of the foot traffic by choosing a seat in the rear cabin.

Seats 11 D/F as well as 12 A/C and 12 H/K benefit from some additional legroom, as does all of row 17, though beware the infant bassinets are also at these rows so there is a possibility of disturbance, and the IFE screens are mounted on the bulkhead wall in front of you as there is no seat in front.

We usually hedge our bets around halfway down the first business cabin (row 14 or 15) for this reason, especially on an overnight sector.

Worst Seats

Row 16: Proximity to the galley and toilets means more foot traffic and potentially more noise in this row. Although there is a full galley between row 16 and the first row in the second business class section (row 17), be aware that row 17 has two additional bassinet positions, and that some noise is therefore possible. Avoid.

Row 19: Proximity to first row of the economy class section (row 31) may mean some noise as row 31 has three bassinet positions. Avoid.

Other Tips

If travelling solo, one of the middle seats (D or F) is preferable. In the best case, no one will select the seat next to you, giving you ample extra space. In the worst case, both you and the stranger next to you have unrestricted aisle access (i.e. you won’t be stuck in the window seat having to climb over their legs in the middle of the night, or vice-versa).

As a couple it’s up to you whether you prefer the middle D/F pair for the same unrestricted aisle access for each passenger, or a window pair A/C or H/K. We tend to go for the window pair, as it provides more privacy especially for the window passenger.

777-200 Version 3: Economy Class

The economy cabin on the Version 3 aircraft is identical to the Version 2 aircraft, and so our comments and seat recommendations for that Version equally apply to this one.

Comments?

What did we miss? If you have personal experience of specific seats to favour or avoid on this aircraft, please let us know in the comments section below, and we’ll certainly try to incorporate your feedback.

(Cover Photo: Singapore Airlines)

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